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in baltimore to honor our men and women in uniform from world part to. the time will not dim the glory of their deeds. the same can be said of the heroes and the victims of 9/11. the same can be said of their families, which channeled their grief into action to make america safer, whose commitment of time and generosity of spirit have given all of us strength and made our country stronger. indeed, time will never dim the memory of those who perished, the images of destruction and despair, the moment of pain and anguish, and will never dim the american people's spirit of unity in the wake of the attacks. time will never diminish the courage of our police, firefighters and all the first responders and with the 9/11 bill now all of the land, our country will continue to stand by them, indeed as well as in work. time has left the memories of 9/11 emblazoned on our hard for more than a decade. on this anniversary, and in the years to come, time will continue to tell the true story of 9/11, how the 9/11 families turned a national tragedy into a time of unity. how our country came together wi
baltimore county. she has been a decades long member of people for the american way, and a longtime supporter of amnesty international. she not only thinks globally, but ask locally through city meals with whom she volunteers as a meal deliver in new york city where she lives. [applause] >> turner serves as the chair of the planned parenthood federation of american board of advocates, and has testified before congress on reproductive rights which is your topic here today. besides acting and doing political work, turner is doing one thing, helping keep the spirit of mali allies. she was a newspaper columnist whose wit and passion for politics made her a legend. turner knew her. that's because when former texas governor ann richards was undergoing cancer treatment in manhattan, she happened to move into turner's apartment building. one day i was visiting with richard and they ran into turner. they invited her out for an evening of laughter, tall stories and giving turner a unique appreciation of life and spirit. later when market and go, a journalist known to many of us here in d.c. a
you go to school and what did you study? >> guest: i went to public school in part 10 baltimore until the eighth grade. then i went to some boarding schools or very good in massachusetts. eagle brook school, i was there for eighth and ninth grade. best of its kind. in illinois, there were not too many people going off to schools at that time. half of my friends thought i was sent to military school or sent to reform school, which, played on the judgment of my character. either way, 180 kids at the top of the class. then i went to andover massachusetts, which is a spectacular place. they have one of the best in history departments on earth. i went to williams college in massachusetts. the way that happened was actually one of my mentors was a man who passed way too early. he was the headmaster of andover. in those days, you would go see the headmaster and he would say where would you want to go to college or a a lot of my friends wanted to go to this particular college and he said i don't think that's a good reason for you to go anyplace. he said you want he wants to write history book
? >> guest: i went to public school in part 10 baltimore until the eighth grade. then i went to some boarding schools or very good in massachusetts. eagle brook school, i was there for eighth and ninth grade. best of its kind. in illinois, there were not too many people going off to schools at that time. half of my friends thought i was sent to military s and i do not have a half cent to reform school which may have been a judgment of my character. in any case, still there, 180 kids at the top of massachusetts and i went to philips academy, spectacular place then and now. one of the best history department honor and that includes both colleges. college i went to williams college in massachusetts and the way that happened was one of my mentors was ted pfizer who recently passed much too worthy. he was head master and in those days where do you want to go to college and i guess harvard. why that? a lot of my friends want to go there. i don't think that is a good reason to go anyplace. you want to write history books. i think we will send you to williams with 1800 students. you go there you will
you go to school and what did you study? >> guest: i went to public schooln p10 baltimore until the eighth grade. then i went to some boarding schools or very good in massachusetts. eagle brook school, i was there for eighth and ninth grade. best of its kind. in illinois, there were not too many people going off to schools at that time. half of my friends thought i was sent to military school or sent to reform school, which, played on the judgment of my character. either way, 180 kids at the top of the class. then i went to andover massachusetts, which is a spectacular place. they have one of the best in history departments on earth. i went to williams college in massachusetts. the way that happened was actually one of my mentors was a man who passed way too early. he was the headmaster of andover. in those days, you would go see the headmaster and he would say where would you want to go to college or a a lot of my friends wanted to go to this particular college and he said i don't think that's a good reason for you to go anyplace. he said you want he wants to write history book
city in the country at the time. baltimore, maryland, was the second. and what concerned us, and we felt that we had read a lot about the history, the treatment, the poor treatment of the french toward the vietnamese, we were funding that war. in the 1950s. france as well. and, do you have any comments on our use of agent orange against the country that, as far as we could find, hadn't done anything to anybody? and were there any observations you came across on the 1968 democratic convention, and do you see any hope for this country learning something rather than perpetuating -- i did meet soldiers who said they saw shell oil trucks crossing the front lines into north vietnam. i don't know whether you came across any ties to the oil industry. as part of this. thank you. >> in terms of agent orange, i didn't actually run across much of that in terms of what i saw of the documents in the united states. it's one of these issues -- i mean, if i were alive in vietnam, i would have opposed american intervention. i think the situation over there was already complicated, and what u.s. inter
Search Results 0 to 7 of about 8 (some duplicates have been removed)

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